Feast of Saints Anne & Joachim

Saturday, July 26th

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 8 am Mass of the Anointing of the Sick (upper church)
3:00—3:40 pm Confessions ( shrine )
4:00 pm Solemn Mass, devotions to Good Saint Anne with veneration of St Anne’s relics.
Chaplet and novena prayer to St Anne immediately
follows all Masses from July 18-26

Novena prayer (begins July 18)


The Mysterious Relics of Saint Anne
On Easter AD 792, Charlemagne discovered the relics of Saint Anne with the help of a deaf handicapped boy. It’s a wonderful tale for this feast day of Saint Anne.
Below is the account, preserved in the correspondence of Pope Saint Leo III, concerning the mysterious discovery of the relics of Saint Anne in the presence of the Emperor Charlemagne.
Fourteen years after Our Lord’s death, Saint Mary Magdalen, Saint Martha, Saint Lazarus, and the others of the little band of Christians who were piled into a boat without sails or oars and pushed out to sea to perish — in the persecution of the Christians by the inhabitants of Jerusalem — were careful to carry with them the tenderly loved body of Our Lady’s mother. They feared lest it be profaned in the destruction, which Jesus had told them was to come upon Jerusalem. When, by the power of God, their boat survived and finally drifted to the shores of France, the little company of saints buried Saint Anne’s body in a cave, in a place called Apt, in the south of France. The church, which was later built over the spot, fell into decay because of wars and religious persecutions, and as the centuries passed, the place of Saint Anne’s tomb was forgotten.
The long years of peace, which Charlemagne’s wise rule gave to southern France, enabled the people to build a magnificent new church on the site of the old chapel at Apt. Extraordinary and painstaking labor went into the building of the great structure, and when the day of its consecration arrived [Easter Sunday, 792 A.D.], the beloved Charlemagne, little suspecting what was in store for him, declared himself happy indeed to have journeyed so many miles to be present for the holy occasion. At the most solemn part of the ceremonies, a boy of fourteen, blind, deaf and dumb from birth — and usually quiet and impassive — to the amazement of those who knew him, completely distracted the attention of the entire congregation by becoming suddenly tremendously excited. He rose from his seat, walked up the aisle to the altar steps, and to the consternation of the whole church, struck his stick resoundingly again and again upon a single step.
His embarrassed family tried to lead him out, but he would not budge. He continued frantically to pound the step, straining with his poor muted senses to impart a knowledge sealed hopelessly within him. The eyes of the people turned upon the emperor, and he, apparently inspired by God, took the matter into his own hands. He called for workmen to remove the steps.
A subterranean passage was revealed directly below the spot, which the boy’s stick had indicated. Into this pas sage the blind lad jumped, to be followed by the emperor, the priests, and the workmen.
They made their way in the dim light of candles, and when, farther along the pas sage, they came upon a wall that blocked further advance, the boy signed that this also should be removed. When the wall fell, there was brought to view still another long, dark corridor. At the end of this, the searchers found a crypt, upon which, to their profound wonderment, a vigil lamp, alight and burning in a little walled recess, cast a heavenly radiance.
As Charlemagne and his afflicted small guide, with their companions, stood before the lamp, its light went out. And at the same moment, the boy, blind and deaf and dumb from birth, felt sight and hearing and speech flood into his young eyes, his ears, and his tongue.
“It is she! It is she!” he cried out. The great emperor, not knowing what he meant, nevertheless repeated the words after him. The call was taken up by the crowds in the church above, as the people sank to their knees, bowed in the realization of the presence of something celestial and holy.
The crypt at last was opened, and a casket was found within it. In the casket was a winding sheet, and in the sheet were relics, and upon the relics was an inscription that read, “Here lies the body of Saint Anne, mother of the glorious Virgin Mary.” The winding sheet, it was noted, was of eastern design and texture.
Charlemagne, overwhelmed, venerated with profound gratitude the relics of the mother of Heaven’s Queen. He remained a long time in prayer. The priests and the people, awed by the graces given them in such abundance and by the choice of their countryside for such a heavenly manifestation, for three days spoke but rarely, and then in whispers.
The emperor had an exact and detailed account of the miraculous finding drawn up by a notary and sent to Pope Saint Leo III, with an accompanying letter from himself. These documents and the pope’s reply are preserved to this day. Many papal bulls have attested, over and over again, to the genuineness of Saint Anne’s relics at Apt.
Excerpted from Canterbury Tales. Taken from the catholicculture [dat]org

Chaplet of Saint Anne
1. In honor of Jesus, say 1 Our Father… and 5 Hail Mary’s.
Then say, “Jesus, Mary, Anne, grant us the favor we ask.”
2. In honor of Mary, say 1 Our Father… and 5 Hail Mary’s.
Then say, “Jesus, Mary, Anne, grant us the favor we ask.”
3. In honor of Saint Anne, say 1 Our Father… and 5 Hail Mary’s.
Then say, “Jesus, Mary, Anne, grant us the favor we ask.”

Remember O Saint Anne, whose name signifies grace and mercy, that never was it known that anyone who fled to your protection, implored your help, and sought your intercession was left unaided. Inspired by this confidence, we fly unto you, good and kind mother; before you we kneel, sinful and sorrowful. O holy mother of the immaculate Virgin Mary, despise not our petitions, but hear us and answer our prayer. Amen.

Paschal Triduum schedule

Holy Thursday,

The Mass today specially commemorates the institution of the Holy Eucharist and the ordained Priesthood at the Last Supper. Because it is a Mass of joy and thanksgiving, the Church lays aside the penitential purple and assumes festive white vestments; the altar is decorated; the Gloria is sung.

11:00 am to 12:00 pm – Confessions (shrine)
7:00 pm – MASS OF THE LORD’S SUPPER (upper church) followed by Eucharistic procession to the altar of repose in the Rosary Chapel. The church will remain open for visits to the Blessed Sacrament until 10:00 pm. Shortly before closing, we will pray Compline, the Church’s official night prayer.

Good Friday,

Today’s special liturgical act solemnly commemorates the Passion and death of our Lord.

11:00 am to 12:00 pm – Confessions (shrine)
3:00 pm – CELEBRATION OF THE PASSION OF THE LORD (upper church)
7:00 pm – 122nd annual Way of the Cross (upper church)

Holy Saturday,

Holy Saturday is liturgically a day of deepest mourning, as the Church meditates on our Lord’s sacred Passion and death. There is no Mass in the morning or afternoon; the sacred altar is bare. The celebration of the Lord’s Resurrection begins at sunset tonight with the Easter Vigil Mass.

11:00 am to 12:00 pm – Confessions (shrine)

Easter Vigil

7:00 pm – SOLEMN EASTER VIGIL (upper church)

Lenten Day of Recollection

Sunday, March

Lenten Day of Recollection

IMG_2364Father Peter Stravinskas, Ph.D., S.T.D.
author, educator, editor of The Catholic Response

3:00 to 4:15 pm – Talk: “The Sacrament of Penance: Its Biblical and Theological Meaning” followed by Q&A (shrine)

4:30 to 5:30 pm – Talk: “The Passion Narrative according to St John: A Meditative Guide” (shrine)

5:45 pm – Solemn Vespers & Benediction (church)

6:30 pm – Holy Mass (church)

Saint Joseph’s Day

Wednesday, March

Our Lord Jesus Christ employed thirty years assiduously obeying Joseph and Mary. This humble obedience of the Son of God teaches us that the dignity of St Joseph is above that of all the other Saints, except that of the Queen of Saints. As Our Lord was pleased to be subject to St Joseph upon the earth, so He is now pleased to grant whatever this Saint asks for in heaven. We should be particularly devout to St Joseph, that he may obtain for us a happy death.
STJOSEPHNOVENA

Spouse of the Blessed Virgin Mary
Patron Saint of the Universal Church

[ All events in the lower church ]

7:15 am Mass

11:30 am Mass followed by the Litany of St Joseph

Ash Wednesday

Wednesday, March 5th

ash-wednesdayAsh Wednesday begins the liturgical season of Lent, which formerly began with the First Sunday and comprised only thirty-six days. The addition of Wednesday and the three following days brought the number to forty, which is that of our Lord’s fast in the desert. In the Old Law ashes were generally a symbolic expression of grief, mourning, or repentance. In the early Church the use of ashes formed part of the public penances. The blessing and imposition of ashes was originally instituted for public penitents, but is now intended for all Christians, as Lent should be a time of penance for all.

The imposition of ashes will take place in the lower church (shrine) at the regularly scheduled morning Masses (7:15 & 11:30 am) and at a Liturgy of the Word (not Mass) at 6:30 pm. All are welcome to receive ashes (whether Catholic or not), but only practicing Catholics in the state of grace are permitted to receive Holy Communion at Mass.

Blessing of throats on St. Blaise day

St. Blaise day in February

2_3_blaseToday is the memorial of Saint Blaise, Bishop and Martyr. He was bishop of Sebaste in Armenia in the fourth century and was beheaded during the persecution of Licinius. While in prison, he miraculously cured a small boy who was choking to death on a fishbone lodged in his throat. Saint Blaise is invoked for his protection against any physical ailment of the throat.

The blessing of throats will take place at the end of Mass today.

Candlemas Day

Sunday, February

purificationForty days after Christmas, we celebrate the Feast of the Presentation of the Lord. The feast recalls the scene in the Gospel of Luke when Mary and Joseph bring the baby Jesus to the Temple as Mary receives ritual purification after childbirth as the Law required. There Jesus is recognized by Simeon as the one who is to be “a light of revelation to the Gentiles.” This sunday is also known as Candlemas Day because of the special blessing of candles that are included in the liturgy.

No Masses this Wed. & Thurs.

Wed. & Thurs., January 15th & 16th

Because of the priests’ convocation (see messages in the BULLETIN), there will be no Masses here at St Anne’s on Wednesday and Thursday of this week. Those wishing to attend Mass in the city on those days must go either to St Bernadette’s (8:00 am) or St Anne’s Hospital chapel (11:30 am). On those days the shrine will be opened later than usual, at approximately 7:30 am.