Holy Week and Paschal Triduum schedule

 Holy Week,

In the west, it is  the last week of Lent, and includes Passion Sunday, Holy Wednesday (Spy Wednesday), Holy Thursday, Good Friday (Holy Friday), and Holy Saturday. It does not include Easter Sunday, which is the beginning of Easter and another liturgical week. Holy Week begins with what our Church calls Palm Sunday of the Passion of the Lord. In the Roman Rite, before 1955 it was known simply as Palm Sunday.
Our Solemn Mass will be celebrated with CCD students leading the procession at 10 am.

Holy Thursday,

The Mass today specially commemorates the institution of the Holy Eucharist and the ordained Priesthood at the Last Supper. Because it is a Mass of joy and thanksgiving, the Church lays aside the penitential purple and assumes festive white vestments; the altar is decorated; the Gloria is sung.

11:00 am to 12:00 pm – Confessions (Shrine)
7:00 pm – MASS OF THE LORD’S SUPPER (Shrine) followed by Eucharistic procession to the altar of repose in the Rosary Chapel. The church will remain open for visits to the Blessed Sacrament until 10:00 pm for the family prayer.

Good Friday,

Today’s special liturgical act solemnly commemorates the Passion and death of our Lord.

10:00 am rehearsals for the Confirmation class, RCIA and Altar Servers

11:00 am to 12:00 pm – Confessions (Shrine)
3:00 pm – CELEBRATION OF THE PASSION OF THE LORD (Shrine)
7:00 pm – Youth’s Station of the Cross (Shrine)

Holy Saturday,

Holy Saturday is liturgically a day of deepest mourning, as the Church meditates on our Lord’s sacred Passion and death. There is no Mass in the morning or afternoon; the sacred altar is bare. The celebration of the Lord’s Resurrection begins at sunset tonight with the Easter Vigil Mass.

10:00 am rehearsals for the Confirmation class, RCIA and Altar Servers

11:00 am to 12:00 pm – Confessions (Shrine)

3:00 pm – 3:30 pm confessions

Easter Vigil

7:00 pm – SOLEMN EASTER VIGIL MASS (Shrine)

Easter Vigil Mass does satisfy the obligation for Easter Sunday. Actually Easter Vigil is the Highest Mass of the entire year. It is during the Easter Vigil Mass that the catechumens and candidates are baptized, confirmed, and welcomed into the Church. That is such a wonderful time for the Church! Only after the solemn vigil during the night, held in anticipation of the resurrection, does the Easter celebration begin, with a spirit of joy that overflows into the following period of fifty days.

Easter Sunday Mass schedule

10 am and 6:30 pmHomilybp

Bishop da Cunha’s  Easter Message

 

Dear Friends,

 

When I was growing up, I remember how important Holy Week was, especially Good Friday. It was not only a day of fasting and abstinence, but also a day of quiet, a day of prayer, reflection on the Lord’s passion and death. We were not supposed to watch television or listen to music, but spend the day in prayer and reflection on the passion of Jesus. So it was indeed a different and special day. It seemed that, at least in our culture and our time, we gave more emphasis to Good Friday than to Easter Sunday.

Although Good Friday is a very important day in our Christian tradition and in our spirituality, Easter is truly the summit of our feasts and it cannot be second to any other liturgical celebration. We are Christians not because we believe in suffering and death, or Lent and Good Friday, but because Christ rose from the dead, and therefore we believe in life, love, and joy.

Easter is the mystery of God the Father rewarding Jesus for his sacrifice, suffering, and his obedience to all that the Father asked him to do. Easter is the proof of God’s love for humanity and our assurance that God wants all of us to be raised up after our own death and to live with him forever.

“If there is no resurrection of the dead, then neither has Christ been raised. And if Christ has not been raised, then empty (too) is our preaching; empty, too, your faith.” (I Cor. 15:13). The celebration of Easter is our way of saying, professing, and celebrating the victory of good over evil, of grace over sin, and of life over death. It is a time for us to know and celebrate not only Christ’s victory, but our own as well. We rise the moment we begin to climb out of whatever hole we are in, the minute we begin to get over whatever is holding us back.

Easter means the passage from the old to the new. It means a new beginning, leaving sin behind, and covering ourselves with the new grace of Christ. It means putting away the darkness of ignorance and putting on the light of his truth. Easter is when we are washed clean in the waters of baptism, our lives are renewed, and we are never the same again.

When Jesus conquered death in his body, he conquered it in ours. We are called to live a life of appreciation of the Resurrection of Jesus and of our own. Ultimately, it is the Resurrection that gives meaning to life. Life doesn’t make sense unless we can make some sense out of death, and death does not make sense without the Resurrection.

As I celebrate my first Easter as the servant of God’s people here in the Diocese of Fall River, my hope and prayer is that this Easter of 2015 will bring renewed hope to all of us, so that we may  continue living and practicing our faith and rejoicing in the abiding presence of our loving God. Happy Easter! Feliz Páscoa! !Felices Pascuas de Resurrección!

Sincerely yours in Christ,

+ Edgar M. da Cunha

Most Reverend Edgar M. da Cunha, S.D.V., D.D.

Bishop of Fall River


Leave a Reply